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Breaking: Disney, 21st Century Fox acquisition and the likelihood of a DOJ block

The DOJ will look at the wider scope, which is that this in all essence would form an entertainment monger, and has extensive “reshaping implications” on the landscape that almost weaponizes the industry in their favor.

By RUSSELL BERGER

For [roughly] the last two weeks– hell, even longer it’s been basic “acceptance” that Disney would be acquiring a large portion of 21st Century Fox‘s assets. Brent Lang of Variety reported earlier this week to expect a deal to be announced Thursday [today,] and I don’t think it’s wrong to just accept that it would be happening. And as we’ve found out today, Brookes Barnes of the New York Times confirmed it appears to be happening, Continue reading “Breaking: Disney, 21st Century Fox acquisition and the likelihood of a DOJ block”

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Professors say Trump still writing his own history

“What history will say will depend a whole lot on the economy’s growth, whether people find jobs, physical health determination and whether the world is closer to peace.”

READ THE ORIGINAL BRADFORD ERA ARTICLE HERE5981331edcfb6.image

President Donald Trump, accompanied by his daughter Ivanka Trump, speaks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, during an event with small business owners as part of “American Dream Week.” (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Bradford Era article by SIDNEY PERALTA

Once everything is all said and done, the 45th administration of the United States will be a part of history. Whether that history will be looked back upon positively or negatively is still up for debate, as the Trump administration is still just a few months shy of its first year.

Dr. Rick Frederick, professor of history at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, suggested that it was difficult to predict how the current presidency will be perceived down the line because of “how different of a president he is.”

Frederick believes that the President Donald Trump’s attempt to deliver policy is “sort of a bull rush,” with members of his own party showing resistance.

“This kind of tactic isn’t necessarily new, but it is much more used in the current administration, which has left (Trump) high and dry in his attempts to pass any significant legislation,” Frederick said.

Dr. Andrew Dzirkalis, an associate professor emeritus of political science at Pitt-Bradford, shared a similar sentiment about the president’s tactics, adding that the White House seems to be in a bit of turbulence.

“I have a general tendency to believe that Trump is doing some things rather well,” Dzirkalis said. “I just worry about his ego and his tendency to want be in charge of every detail. This is leading to a loosely structured White House.”

Dzirkalis further explained that the turbulence that Trump’s tactics has on the White House extends to every member in his staff, which can lead to them individually pursuing their own line.

With the administration looking to cut close to $3 billion from the Pell Grant, which is primarily used by students in need of help with the cost of higher education, Dzirkalis was in favor of the president’s stance.

“As a college professor, I’m not at all happy with all of our education,” he said. “It’s been oversold, with people believing that everybody ought to have a higher education. It’s rather unrealistic.”

Dzirkalis explained that although he agrees with the decision to cut back on spending for higher education, he would like to see the money reinvested into trade education.

“We need good electricians, welders and carpenters,” he said. “It can be a very rewarding and satisfying experience.”

Frederick took the opposite stance, frustrated with the cuts to higher education.

“It’s extremely demeaning to treat higher education as if it’s a detriment to the country,” he said. “(Trump) keeps talking about ‘no chaos’ in the White House when actions like this prove to anyone looking from the outside that there is nothing but madness going on there.”

Frederick maintained that it is still too soon to decide whether the Trump administration will end positively or negatively.

“We’ve got a long way to go, but as of now, he seems to refuse to work with Democrats in any way,” Frederick said. “I can only hope that he attempts to make compromises with Congress.”

Dzirkalis agreed about the premature analysis of the administration, even though he says he’s frustrated with the disorganization of the White House.

“What history will say will depend a whole lot on the economy’s growth, whether people find jobs, physical health determination and whether the world is closer to peace,” he said. “Will we have solved a lot of our international issues as well as our internal issues, these are the things that will determine the current administration’s place in history.”

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Local U.S: Parents lose custody because of low IQs.

amy-fabbriniAmy Fabbrini and Eric Ziegler lost custody of their eldest son, Christopher, shortly after he was born and social services took their second son, Hunter, directly from hospital after he was born.

By SIDNEY PERALTA 

“We have cut the links between child and parent, and between man and man, and between man andwoman. No one dares trust a wife or a child or a friend any longer. But in the future there will be no wives and no friends. Children will be taken from their mothers at birth, as one takes eggs from a hen.”

An excerpt from George Orwell’s 1984.

A couple are fighting a protracted legal battle after they lost custody of their children because they have “limited cognitive abilities“.

Amy Fabbrini, 31, and Eric Ziegler, 38, have been trying to prove to the state of Oregon for nearly four years that they are intellectually capable of raising their children.

The state’s Department of Human Services removed their eldest son, Christopher, shortly after he was born, because both parents had “limited cognitive abilities that interfere with [their] ability to safely parent the child,” The Oregonian reports.

Five months ago, they took their second son, Hunter, directly from hospital after he was born.

Members of the family alerted the authorities when Ms Fabbrini brought Christopher to her father’s home, where she was also looking after her 6-year-old twins from a previous marriage.

Child welfare records accused Mr Ziegler of “sleeping with the baby on the floor and [having] almost rolled over on him,” as well as being “easily frustrated” and saying he “often forgets to feed his dog.”

Ms Fabbrini’s father, Raymond Fabbrini, told The Oregonian: “She doesn’t have the instincts to be a mother.”

He added: “Me and Amy were never close. She got me mad so many times. She wouldn’t do nothing.”

Psychological tests said Ms Fabbrini had an IQ of about 72, placing her at the “extremely low to borderline range of intelligence”. Mr Ziegler was given an IQ of around 66, putting him in the “mild range of intellectual disability”.

The average IQ is between 90 and 110.

An advocator for the couple, Sherrene Hagenbach, said: “They are saying they are intellectually incapable without any guidelines to go by.”

No domestic abuse or neglect was found in the case.

Ms Hagenbach added: “They’re saying that this foster care provider is better for the child because she can provide more financially, provide better education, things like that.

“If we’re going to get on that train, Bill Gates should take my children. There’s always somebody better than us, so it’s a very dangerous position to be in.”

Ms Hagenbach started a petition, which has over 1,600 supporters, to return Christopher and Hunter to Ms Fabbrini and Mr Ziegler’s care.

“I quickly discovered that this family had no problem at all taking care of their son. They showed loving attention, were attentive to his needs, and at this point had been fighting faithfully in court for almost three years to prove to CPS that they were capable and loving parents.”

Ms Hagenbach, board member of Healthy Families of the High Desert, added: “In my professional opinion, after multiple sessions observing Amy and Eric interact with their son for hours on end, I found no reason they should have had their child taken from them and placed in the State’s care.

“Any reasonably trained and educated CPS worker should have arrived at the same conclusion, as I documented in the session notes of every visit.

“The couple demonstrated competent parenting skills with Christopher, had no history of abuse or neglect, and expressed a deep desire to have Christopher returned to them to raise him along with the mother’s twin boys.”

 

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BREAKING: U.S. show of force against N. Korea after latest missile test.

The United States flew two supersonic bombers over the Korean Peninsula on Sunday in a show of force against North Korea following the country’s latest intercontinental ballistic missile test. The U.S. also said it conducted a successful test of a missile defense system located in Alaska.

The B-1 bombers were escorted by South Korean fighter jets as they performed a low-pass over an air base near the South Korean capital of Seoul before returning to Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, the U.S. Pacific Air Forces said in a statement.

The United States often sends powerful warplanes in times of heightened tensions with North Korea. B-1 bombers have been sent to South Korea for flyovers several times this year in response to the North’s banned missile tests, and also following the death of a U.S. college student last month after he was released by North Korea in a coma.

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After deadly attack, Islamic Committee still makes demands of security removal

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The Associated Press

A military wing of the Fatah movement, hold their weapons during a parade against Israeli arrangements in a contested Jerusalem shrine, along the streets of Gaza City, Tuesday, July 25, 2017.

By SIDNEY PERALTA

After placing cameras and railings in response to the deadly shooting of two police officers at a a contested shrine in Israel, the Supreme Islamic Committee is demanding the security measures be removed.

Head of the committee Ikrema Sabri has called for mass prayer protests until the metal railings, iron bridge and newly installed cameras are taken down at the Jewish Temple Mount, known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary. This comes after Israel had already removed metal detectors from the site which were installed to try and restore calm and a sense of safety.

According the Associated Press report, Sabri said that Muslims “will not enter the mosque until these things are implemented,” and that they are awaiting a response from the police.

Although the security measures were placed as a rational response to the tragic attack at the site, The Islamic Committee as well as other Palestinians saw it as an attempt to expand control over the site by Israel.

Israel was forced to respond and remove the original security measures after mass protest and civil unrest ensued, with members of the Muslim community clashing with those of the Jewish community that threatened to expand into conflict with other Muslim nations.

Israel installed the security cameras and railings instead as a compromise, but it was not enough for the Islamic Committee as they are demanding the cameras be taken down as well under the claim that Israel is seeking to take full control of the site, a claim that Israel has vehemently denied.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu seems to have doubled down on his measures of security, with instructions of thorough inspections at the site by Israeli police officers.

Netanyahu and Israel may find itself in a tough spot in the coming days as other Muslim nations and authorities chime in on the matter with all claiming the security measures as an attempt by Israel to take over the site.

According to the Associated Press, Israel’s foreign ministry responded by calling the comments delusional, baseless and distorted. They followed up by saying “The days of the Ottoman Empire are over. . . He who lives in a palace of glass would be better off not throwing stones.”

TITANS — Just when you thought Hawk and Dove couldn’t look cool

It’s melding the campiness of the characters with a realistic approach to the question, “How would Hank and Dawn look if they were in the real world?”

By RUSSELL BERGER

Last week we got our first official look at Brenton Thwaites as Robin [a.k.a. Dick Grayson] on the upcoming exclusive direct-to-consumer streaming service DC Comics will be launching next year [2018,] TITANS. It came basically unannounced that it would occur, and whenever something like that drops, it spikes interest in whatever it belongs to. Now, while I was a bit disappointed in the choice of stage that Dick would be in his “career” as a hero, I generally liked the costume design. It had a BATMAN V SUPERMAN style vibe to it, and felt– well, real.

Well, we knew that two of DC Comics‘ more underappreciated heroes would be appearing in the show, HAWK and DOVE, as Derek Lawrence of Entertainment Weekly had announced Alan Ritchson (Smallville) and Minka Kelly (Friday Night Lights) were cast as Hank Hall/Hawk and Dawn Granger/Dove in TITANS. The characters have their own cult following, and any die-hard DC Comics fan is going to at least know of them. I thought [even before the Thwaites reveal as Robin] that the biggest hurdle the show would have is presenting this two to the audience in a non campy way, and costume design would play a definite role in that. Continue reading “TITANS — Just when you thought Hawk and Dove couldn’t look cool”

Review: THE SHAPE OF WATER

In a 1960s research facility, a mute janitor forms a relationship with an aquatic creature.

In a 1960s research facility, a mute janitor forms a relationship with an aquatic creature. Do we really have another film of the year on our hands?!

Find out in my review of THE SHAPE OF WATER! Continue reading “Review: THE SHAPE OF WATER”

Review: HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #34 (SPOILERS)

Just from the two issues that Somar has been in, we see how she’s going to be someone to watch out for.

By RUSSELL BERGER

One concern I always had about a team book along the lines of HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS is how it features one lantern — Hal Jordan — in its title and how that would be balanced with incorporating the 7,199 other Green Lanterns. I know from Robert Venditti’s (writer) run on GREEN LANTERN [preREBIRTH] that he had a general handle on being able to keep Hal the focus while folding in characters like Kilowog, Salaak and Gorin-Sunn, but with some many other prominent secondaries, I worried even until last issue– until last. Continue reading “Review: HAL JORDAN AND THE GREEN LANTERN CORPS #34 (SPOILERS)”

DCEU — It appears JUSTICE LEAGUE did NOT spell the end

As a friend of mine once said, “If three billion dollars is a failure, then I want my bank account to be a failure.”

By RUSSELL BERGER

After what seemed like an eternity of hearing a death rattle; from “critics/bloggers” calling for Warner Bros. to “reboot” the DCEU to JUSTICE LEAGUE only reaching $600M globally as of yesterday [December 11th.] The world literally appeared to be crumbling around the DCEU fan base. Almost as if Steppenwolf, himself, had descended and was unleashing an unstoppable assault, but just like in JLhope never dies. Continue reading “DCEU — It appears JUSTICE LEAGUE did NOT spell the end”

Review: BATMAN #36 (SPOILERS)

Batman, Superman, Catwoman and Lois were the noodles, chicken, carrots and celery, and there was plenty of that. I’d argue an overabundance of that, and thus it lacked the broth.

By RUSSELL BERGER

I’m at the point on Tom King’s (writer) BATMAN run where it’s a like-hate relationship. I either like what he’s doing [one minute,] and then hate it the next. This issue was one of those where I wasn’t going to bother checking it out, but the immense fan reaction to it had me scratching my head, “Hmmm, am I missing something glorious here?”
Continue reading “Review: BATMAN #36 (SPOILERS)”

Review: OLD MAN LOGAN #31 (SPOILERS)

So seeing the SILVER SAMURAI really played into the Japanese tone of the issue, and made me realize how great a Logan movie would’ve been in the settings of like The Wolverine.

By RUSSELL BERGER

For nearly two months I’ve been intrigued by the cover of OLD MAN LOGAN #31, since the face of the Scarlet Samurai had been blurred out. But I absolutely love Mukesh Singh’s (artist) art, and the cover [even with a blurred face] was enough to make me want to pick up a Marvel book, which if we’re being honest, for the last 2 [or so] years have been either good or absolute trash– there’s been no in-between,

Old Man Logan – the man who was Wolverine – is up against a foe like no other…the Hand! Logan’s past comes back to haunt him when a former love drags him into battle with the Hand, who have bolstered their forces like never before. Just when things couldn’t get any worse, Logan encounters the mysterious Scarlet Samurai! Will Logan be able to discover who she is and take down the Hand?

Continue reading “Review: OLD MAN LOGAN #31 (SPOILERS)”