ARTICLES AND FACTS ON DEPORTATIONS IN THE UK AS A CONSEQUENCE OF BREXIT

THOSE WHO HAVE PERHAPS ALREADY READ MY FIRST POST, AND OF COURSE ANYONE WANTING TO READ IT FOR THEMSELVES, BELOW ARE THE LINKS AND WITH THEM SOME SNIPPETS FROM THOSE ARTICLES.

http://www.independent.co.uk/…/brexit-latest-eu-citizens-de…

https://www.anothereurope.org/european-migrants-are-alread…/

http://theconversation.com/when-britain-can-deport-eu-citiz…

https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/…/if-youre-going-to-be-d…/

If your appeal isn’t likely to succeed you should leave voluntarily, because you’ll be banned from the UK for 10 years if you’re deported. If you choose to leave you can return to the UK in between 1 and 5 years, depending on your circumstances.

If you can appeal an appeal will succeed if:

  • you have strong connections and family in the UK
  • the original decision racially discriminates against you
  • going back to your home country would be unsafe
  • the decision breaks the law or immigration rules.

If you leave the UK voluntarily, if you pay for your journey home, you can apply to return to the UK in 1 year.
You should tell the Home Office in writing that you’re planning to leave.
You can get help from the government if you can’t pay for your journey home. Depending on your circumstances, you might qualify for:

  • ‘voluntary departure’ – you’ll get some help with arranging and paying for your journey
  • ‘assisted voluntary returns’ – you’ll get some help arranging and paying for your journey, and building a life in the country you return to.

You can apply to return to the UK:

  • in 2 years if you leave within 6 months of being told to leave
  • in 5 years if it takes you longer than 6 months to leave

https://www.theguardian.com/…/man-detained-threatened-with-…

https://www.theguardian.com/…/marcin-gwozdzinski-immigratio…

https://www.theguardian.com/…/hostile-environment-the-hardl…

Despite the recent 84,000 fall in annual net migration to 248,000 – much of it due to the return home of highly skilled EU nationals insecure about their post-Brexit status in the UK – her target is still nowhere in sight. This is not due to any lack of effort on May’s part: during her six years as home secretary, she presided over seven immigration bills and 45,000 changes to the immigration rules.

Relentlessly, inexorably, any British citizen who has simply had the temerity to fall in love with a foreigner and wishes to live in the country of their birth with their family is finding themselves at the wrong end of an uncaring bureaucracy. As is anyone living in the UK without the right paperwork, even if that paperwork was given to them when they moved here as children. As is any foreign national who finds themselves accused of wrongdoing, even if they dispute the accusations and have been living an organised, tax-paying life here in the UK for many years. Or any EU national who, thanks to legislation last year, is found sleeping rough.

The tactics, however, are multiplying: landlords are now required to carry out checks on tenants’ immigration status. Hospitals, community interest companies and charities receiving NHS funds must conduct ID checks on patients before treatment in order to bill them if they are found not eligible for NHS care. From January, banks and building societies will be compelled to carry out immigration checks on the owners of 70m current accounts.

In a post-Brexit Britain, the picture is set to get even harsher. The right under which EU nationals can bring family members, including spouses, to live with them in the UK is already a flashpoint in the Brexit talks on citizens’ rights. But in October, a leaked Home Office document suggested the government wants to go further in weakening family reunion rights for EU nationals in Britain, turning thousands more into so-called “Skype families”.

But May’s “hostile environment” is already wrecking lives – as the following stories show.

https://www.theguardian.com/…/home-office-apologises-for-le…

The government has repeatedly told the 3.5 million EU nationals living in the UK they did not need to apply for residency after Brexit because their status was not at risk. Despite this, there have been several occasions where people have been told wrongly they should leave the country after trying to apply for permanent residency but this is the first time the Home Office has issued a letter telling people to leave.

Holmberg added that the situation was evidence of serious failings at the Home Office. “I believe this is a case of incompetence,” she said. “They don’t have enough resources to handle their application procedures and there is, so to speak, a fault inbuilt in the system.”

https://www.express.co.uk/…/Europe-EU-deport-million-Govern…

One MILLION EU citizens could face deportation on day one of Brexit. The group estimates it would take the Government 47 years to process all the applications for EU citizens for permanent residency.

http://www.zeit.de/…/grossbritannien-brexit…/komplettansicht